ARTISTSONGALBUM
Ian Zack InterviewInterviewSay No to the Devil: The Life and Musical Genius of Rev. Gary Davis
Rev. Gary Davis Lord I Wish I Could See Rev. Blind Gary Davis 1935-1949
Rev. Gary Davis CocaineBlues & Ragtime
Rev. Gary Davis Samson and Delilah Harlem Street Singer
Rev. Gary Davis O, Glory Apostolic Studio Sessions
Rev. Gary Davis CrucifixionA Little More Faith
Rev. Gary Davis The Boy Was Kissing The Girl The Guitar And Banjo Of Reverend Gary Davis
Rev. Gary Davis Candy ManThe Blues & Salvation
Rev. Gary Davis Death Don't Have No Mercy Harlem Street Singer
Rev. Gary Davis Out On The Ocean Sailing Apostolic Studio Sessions
Rev. Gary Davis You Got To Go Down Rev. Blind Gary Davis 1935-1949
Rev. Gary Davis Lord, I Looked Down The Road Say No To The Devil
Rev. Gary Davis Goin' To Sit Down On The Banks of the River Harlem Street Singer
Rev. Gary Davis Get Right Church American Street Songs
Rev. Gary Davis Hesitation Blues Blues & Ragtime
Rev. Gary Davis I Belong To The BandHarlem Street Singer
Rev. Gary Davis I Heard The Angels Singing Demons & Angels
Rev. Gary Davis Fast Fox Trot aka Buck Rag The Guitar And Banjo Of Reverend Gary Davis
Rev. Gary Davis You Can Go HomeRev. Blind Gary Davis 1935-1949

Show Notes:

ISay No To The Devil Bookn Ian Zack's new book, Say No to the Devil: The Life and Musical Genius of Rev. Gary Davis, Zack calls Davis "arguably the greatest of all the blues-based guitarists to record before World War II" and the "…remained, up until the last years of his life, one of the world’s greatest, if not the greatest, of all traditional blues and ragtime guitarists." Davis ran with legendary bluesmen such as Willie Walker and Blind Boy Fuller down South, making his debut with fifteen sides cut in 1935 for the ARC label. In the 1940's he moved to New York where he recorded prolifically in the post-war years starting with a few scattered sides in the 1940's, more in the 1950's before really picking up steam in the 1960's. While he was never a star on the folk scene or blues revival, he attracted a flock of devoted mostly white followers who learned directly from him and many in turn became well known musicians in their own right ensuring that Davis' legacy was carried on. "Davis", Zack writes, "would come to regard many of his top students as his children, and he wanted them to carry on both his name and his music." Recent years have seen numerous posthumous releases, musical tributes, books and a movie. Say No to the Devil is a thoroughly researched and well written account of Davis' life and one of the better musical biographies in recent years.

I haven't played Davis all that much over the years on the show despite having many of his records. Reading the biography inspired me to dip back into those albums and rediscover many songs I'd half forgotten. Today we interview the author, Ian Zack, as well as playing a diverse selection of Davis' music spanning the 1930's through the 70's.

Davis was an accomplished guitar player at an early age, supposedly playing in a string band at the age of fourteen in Greenville with legendary guitarist Willie Walker (Walker recorded one 78 for Columbia in 1930, "Dupree Blue b/w South Carolina Rag"). By the late 20's Davis had moved to Durham. "For Davis", Zack writes, "the tension between the sacred and the secular world would reach a peak during his time in Durham, just when he might have been on the cusp of major success as a musician." During this period Davis described himself as a "blues cat."

In 1935 storekeeper and talent scout J. B. Long, the manager of Blind Boy Fuller "discovered" Davis. "Oh, [Gary] could play the guitar up and down, any way in the world," he later recalled (from Bruce Bastin's Red River Blues). Davis exerted a considerable influence on Fuller. Davis and Fuller were among a group of Durham musicians Long escorted to New York City to record for ARC, the race music subsidiary of Columbia Records. Between July 23 and July 26 Davis recorded 15 sides (1 unissued): ten religious songs, and two blues numbers. Sometime in the early thirties Davis had a religious awakening and by the end of the decade was an ordained minister. Long tried to get him to record again in 1939 but he declined likely because he refused to play blues. It was ten years before Davis made another record.

Rev. Gary Davis with the daughter of Alice
Ochs and Phil Ochs. Photo by Alice Ochs

In 1937 Davis married Annie Bell Wright, a woman as deeply spiritual as himself, and she looked after him devotedly until his death. In 1943 she moved to New York with Davis following in 1944. They soon moved to 169th Street in Harlem, where they lived for the next 18 years and where Davis preached in various storefront churches. During this time Davis also busked and preached on the streets: "dressed in a suit and tie, with a tin cup pinned to his overcoat or fastened to his guitar, and wearing dark aviator sunglasses over his eyes, he performed both spirituals and instrumental dance tunes-but no blues, unless he was asked to teach a song."

It didn't take Davis long to get involved with the fledgling New York folk scene. "Although folk music wouldn't hit the mainstream for more than a decade, New York already had an established folk music underground that included performers, record producers, and club owners." Davis eventually toured Europe and played at numerous folk festivals including the Cambridge and Newport Folk Festivals (1959, 1965, and 1968).

It didn't take him long to resume his recording career either. He made his first post-war sides in 1945, cut sides for Continental in 1949, recorded in 1950 with tracks appearing on the Folkways album Music in the Streets, in 1954 for the Stinson label and 1956 for Riverside. During this period the following albums were issued: The Singing Reverend w/ Sonny Terry and American Street Songs with songs split between Davis and Pink Anderson. Davis recorded in 1957 but these recordings were not released until 1963 when they were issued by the British 77 label as Pure Religion and Bad Company. His finest recordings during this period were the four he did for the Prestige label: Harlem Street Singer, Say No to the Devil, A Little More Faith and The Guitar and Banjo of Reverend Gary Davis.

A pleasant surprise in recent years are a number of unreleased Davis recordings that have surfaced. Among the notable ones include: If I Had My Way: Early Home Recordings, Demons and Angels: The Ultimate Collection (3 CD), Sun of Our Life: Solos, Songs, A Sermon, 1955-1957, Manchester Free Trade Hall 1964, Live at Gerde's Folk City (3 CD) and At Home and Church (3 CD), the latter two released by Davis ' student Stephan Grossman.

The Angel's Message To Me 78
Originally issued on ARC in 1935
then on the dime store label Melotone in 1936

Among folk revival guitar players of the 1950's and early '60s Reverend Gary Davis's finger picking style was legendary. One of the first to adopt it was Ramblin' Jack Elliott, who recorded "Cocaine Blues" and "Candyman." Dave Van Ronk studied with Davis and also covered many of his songs. Other aspiring folk guitarists and blues players swarmed to take lessons from him including Bob Weir, Stefan Grossman, Ernie Hawkins, Dion, Steve Katz, Janis Ian, Dave Bromberg, Ry Cooder, Roy Bookbinder, Larry Johnson, Jorma Kaukonen among others. As one of Davis' admirers, Terri Thal, recalled: "We worshiped him, musically. Because of Gary's musicianship-not his fame, he wasn't that famous-people were awestruck."

He "…never became an American cultural icon like Armstrong or Muddy Waters. Four decades after his death, his genius has gone largely unrecognized in the popular culture, even though he exerted a considerable influence on the folk scene of the sixties and on the early rock scene of the seventies." Undoubtedly his fame would have been greater had he chosen to focus on blues. "The business of saving souls", Zack writes, "is what occupied him, and fame didn't seem to motivate him. … It could be said that Davis turned Robert Johnson's legend on its head: he didn't sell his soul to the devil, as Johnson was rumored to have done, to acquire superhuman blues guitar chops. Rather, Davis renounced blues music in his prime and devoted his life to God as a preacher. When recording blues material might have opened doors or record producers wallets-and stamped an express ticket out of poverty-Davis refused again and again."

Ian Zack Interview [edited] (MP3, 37 min.)

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ARTISTSONGALBUM
Peg Leg HowellNew Prison BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg HowellFo' Day BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg HowellCoal Man Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg HowellTishamingo Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg HowellNew Jelly Roll BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg HowellBeaver Slide RagViolin, Sing The Blues For Me
Macon Ed & Tampa Joe Mean Florida BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Macon Ed & Tampa Joe Worrying Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg Howell & His GangMoanin' & Groanin' BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg Howell & His GangPeg Leg StompPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg Howell & His GangPapa Stobb BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg Howell & His GangHobo Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg Howell Skin Game Blues Before The Blues Vol. 2
Peg Leg Howell & His Gang Too Tight BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Sloppy Henry Long, Tall, Disconnected Mama Peg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Sloppy Henry Say I Do ItPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg HowellRock & Gravel BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Peg Leg Howell & Eddie Anthony Banjo Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg Howell & Eddie Anthony Turkey Buzzard BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Henry Williams & Eddie Anthony Lonesome Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 1 1926-1928
Henry Williams & Eddie Anthony Georgia Crawl Folks, He Sure Do Pull Some Bow!
Peg Leg HowellTurtle Dove BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg HowellWalkin' BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg HowellAway From home Hard Times Come Again No More Vol. 2
Macon Ed & Tampa JoeEverything's Coming My WayPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Macon Ed & Tampa JoeWinging That ThingPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Brothers Wright And WilliamsI've Got A Home In Beulah LandPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Sloppy HenryCaned Heat BluesMy Rough And Rowdy Ways Vol. 2
Sloppy HenryRoyal Palm Special BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg HowellBroke & Hungry Blues Peg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg Howell & Jim Hill Monkey Man BluesPeg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930
Peg Leg Howell & Jim Hill Chittlin' Supper Peg Leg Howell Vol. 2 1928-1930

Show Notes:

Peg Leg Howell and His Gang
Henry Williams, Eddie Anthony, Peg Leg Howell

Like Memphis, Atlanta was a staging post for musicians on their way to all points. It’s not surprising then that the first country blues musician, Ed Andrews, was recorded there in 1924. The company that recorded him, Okeh, was one of many to send their engineers to Southern cities to record local talent. Companies like Victor, Columbia, Vocalion and Brunswick made at least yearly visits until the depression. One of the earliest recorded Atlanta bluesmen, Peg Leg Howell, bridged the gap between the era of pre-blues and the period when the blues eventually became the popular music of the day. Born Joshua Barnes Howell in Eatonton, Georgia on March 5, 1888, he was a self-taught guitarist who acquired his nickname after a 1916 run-in with an irate brother-in-law which ended in a shotgun wound to the leg and, ultimately, amputation. Unable to continue working as a farmhand, he migrated to Atlanta, where he began pursuing music full-time; in addition to playing street corners for passing change, Howell supplemented his income by bootlegging liquor, an offense which led to a one-year prison sentence in 1925. He recorded four songs at the end of 1926, eight sides in 1927 with guitarist Henry Williams and Eddie Anthony which were billed as Peg Leg Howel and his gang. Ten final sides were recorded in 1929. Tony Russell described the music as "rugged and without artifice. Howell's early recordings like 'Coal Man Blues' do no lack appeal but are rather overshadowed by his trio sides with Anthony and Williams, which give us a stringband music both less suave and more diverse than that of their near-contemporaries the Mississippi Sheiks." Howell backed singer Sloppy Henry on a few sides and his pals Eddie Anthony and Henry Williams also recorded on their own.

1927 columbia Catalog
Peg Leg Howell featured on a 1927 Columbia catalog

In 1963 three high school students – George Mitchell, Roger Brown, and Jack Boozer tracked Howell down. Mitchell coaxed him into recording again. After a month of practicing on the guitar, Howell made the field recordings that were issued by Testament Records as The Legendary Peg Leg Howell. Howell was also interviewed by Mitchell the results of which were published in Blues Unlimited (the full article is provided below) which is where the below quotes come from.

"My friends call me Peg, …Peg Leg Howell. I was born on the fifth of March. in 1888. I was born in Eatonton, Putnom. County, Georgia. …My father was a farmer. when I was a child I went to school in Putnam County; I went as far as the ninth grade before I stopped. After that I worked on my father's farm with him…plowed. Worked on the farm until 1916, when I was about 28. …I had lost my leg in 1916 and had to quit farm work. I got shot by my brother-in-law; he got mad at me and shot me. …I came to Atlanta when I was about 35 years old. …I learned how to play the guitar about 1909. I learnt myself – didn't take long to learn. I just stayed up one night and learnt myself."

He began performing music in parks and on the streets of Atlanta, sometimes working alongside mandolinist Eugene Pedin, guitarist Henry Williams, and violinist Eddie Anthony, his closest friend. “The men from Columbia Records found me there in Atlanta. A Mr. Brown – he worked for Columbia – he asked me to make a record for them. I was out serenading, playing on Decatur Street, and he heard me playing and taken me up to his office and I played there. …My first record. was "New Prison Blues" (coupled with "Fo Day Blues" on Columbia 14177D). In 1925 I had been in prison for s selling whiskey and I heard the song there. I don't know who made it up. As for selling the whiskey, I would sell it to anybody who came to the house. I bought the moonshine from people who ran it and I sold it. I don't know how they caught me; they just ran down on me one day."

Howell was back before the microphone five months after his debut this time with Henry Williams and Eddie Anthony. His “New Jelly Roll Blues” from this session was his bestselling number and advertised in the Chicago Defender newspaper (Columbia ran eight ads for Howell between 1927 and 1929). The record was listed as Peg Leg Howell and His Gang. The label promoted Peg Leg Howell by putting his photo on the cover of its 1927 catalog. In November 1927, Peg Leg Howell and His Gang recorded three more 78's. "Eddie Anthony recorded with me. He played violin. And Henry Williams; he played guitar. We called the group Peg Leg Howell and His Gang. Made quite a few records with them two."At the November 1st session “Too Tight Blues,” “Moanin’ and Groanin’ Blues,” “Hobo Blues,” and “Peg Leg Stomp” were recorded. Howell made three final Columbia 78's in April 1929. Ollie Griffin was probably the violinist. Three days later, Howell fronted four songs that came out credited to Peg Leg Howell and Jim Hill.

Peg Leg Howell - New Jelly Roll BluesDuring the spring of 1929 Eddie Anthony recorded eight sides for OKeh Records as part of a duo called Macon Ed and Tampa Joe (the identity of Tampa Joe has never been established). On April 19, 1928, Henry Williams and Eddie Anthony recorded a Columbia 78 on their own, the raucous “Georgia Crawl” backed with “Lonesome Blues.” Howell and Anthony were probably the accompanists on a four song session by Sloppy Henry recorded on August 13, 1928. Henry cut sixteen sides between 1924 and 1929 for Okeh. It's been speculated that Anthony plays on on the record "I've Got A Home In Beulah Land" by the Brothers Wright And Williams recorded in 1930.

Henry Williams perished in jail in 1930, and Peg Leg Howell was soon back serving time for bootlegging. After Eddie Anthony died in 1934, Howell told Mitchell, “I just didn’t feel like playing anymore. I went back to selling liquor. Then I ran a woodyard for about two years around 1940. I lost my other leg in 1952, through sugar diabetes.” Howell's final recordings issued on the Testament label captured him in sad shape so those songs will not be featured. Better to remember Howell and his pals in their prime.

Related Reading:

-Welding, Pete; Mitchell, George. “I’m Peg Leg Howell.” Blues Unlimited no. 10 (Mar 1964) [PDF]

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ARTISTSONGALBUM
Hattie HartWon't You Be Kind to Me?Memphis Masters
Hattie HartYou Wouldn't, Would You. Papa?Memphis Jug Band and Cannon's Jug Stomper s
Memphis Jug Band w/ Hattie HartMemphis Yo Yo BluesThe Best Of Memphis Jug Band
Memphis Jug Band K.C. MoanThe Best Of Memphis Jug Band
Memphis Jug Band Cocaine Habit Blues The Best Of Memphis Jug Band
Memphis Jug Band Fourth Street Mess Around Ruckus Juice & Chitlins Vol. 1
Memphis Jug Band w/ Memphis MinnieMeningitis Blues Memphis Shakedown
Sleepy John EstesThe Girl I Love, She Got Long Curly HairI Ain't Gonna Be Worried No More
Sleepy John EstesDivin' Duck Blues I Ain't Gonna Be Worried No More
Sleepy John EstesMilk Cow Blues I Ain't Gonna Be Worried No More
Sleepy John EstesWatcha Doin'?I Ain't Gonna Be Worried No More
Frank StokesSouth Memphis Blues The Best of Frank Stokes
Frank StokesBunker Hill Blues Folks, He Sure Do Pull Some Bow!
Frank StokesRight Now BluesThe Best of Frank Stokes
Blind Clyde ChurchNumber Nine BluesPiano Blues Vol. 1 1927-1936
Blind Clyde ChurchPneumatic BluesPiano Blues Vol. 1 1927-1936
Cannon's Jug Stompers Ripley BluesThe Best of Cannon's Jug Stomp
Cannon's Jug Stompers Viola Lee Blues The Best of Cannon's Jug Stomp
Cannon's Jug Stompers Last Chance BluesThe Best of Cannon's Jug Stomp
Memphis Sanctified SingersHe Got Better Things For You How Can I Keep From Singing Vol. 1
Cannon's Jug Stompers Noah's BluesThe Best of Cannon's Jug Stomp
Cannon's Jug Stompers Going To GermanyThe Best of Cannon's Jug Stomp
Noah Lewis Devil in the WoodpileWhen The Sun Goes Down
Bessie TuckerKey to the Bushes BluesBessie Tucker 1928-1929
Bessie TuckerT.B. Moan Bessie Tucker 1928-1929
Shreveport Home WreckersHome Wreckin' BluesTexas Slide Guitars: Oscar Woods & Black Ace
Shreveport Home WreckersFence Breakin' BluesBottleneck Blues Guitar Classics 1926-1937
Kokomo ArnoldPaddlin' Madeline Blues Kokomo Arnold Vol. 1 1930-1935
Bukka WhiteI Am in the Heavenly WayAmerican Primitive Vol. 1
Bukka WhiteThe Panama LimitedWhen The Sun Goes Down
Memphis Minnie & Kansas JoeI Never Told A Lie Four Women Blues
Memphis Minnie & Kansas JoeDon't Want No WomanFour Women Blues
Memphis Minnie & Kansas JoeGeorgia Skin Four Women Blues

Show Notes:

Victor CatalogToday's show is the fourth installment spotlighting great recording sessions. The first spotlighted two sessions conducted by the Victor label in New Orleans in 1936 and 1937, the second was conducted by Brunswick in Memphis in 1929 and 1930, the third was recordings Columbia made in December 1927 and December 1928 and the fourth spotlighted Victor in Memphis in 1928 .

To feed the demand for blues and gospel records the record companies conducted exhaustive searches for new talent, which included making trips down south with field recording units. As Robert Dixon and John Godrich wrote in the seminal Recording The Blues book: "Victor was the only company systematically to exploit the gold mine of black talent in and around Memphis."  Today we spotlight Victor in Memphis again, this time between Sept. and Nov. 1929 and May through June of 1930. In 1929 Victor recorded Hattie Hart, the Memphis Jug Band, Cannon's Jug Stompers, Noah Lewis, Sleepy John Estes, Blind Clyde Church, Frank Stokes, Memphis Sanctified Singers and Bessie Tucker. In 1930 they recorded several of the same artists in addition to the Shreveport Home Wreckers, Kokomo Arnold, Kaiser Clifton, Bukka White and Memphis Minnie and Kansas Joe.

According to Recording The Blues: "The record industry as a whole had not been in too healthy a state during the early twenties. After the boom year of 1921, in which for the first time 100 million discs were sold, sales declined slowly but steadily. Eventually even Victor began to feel the squeeze – their sales fell from $51 million in 1921 to $44 million in 1923, and then dropped to $20 million in 1925. Something had to be done, and one obvious move was for Victor to begin large scale production of race records, and compete for a market that had been growing an an enormous rate during the period when overall sales had been falling." After a not too promising start, "…Victor hired Ralph Peer who had been largely responsible for building up Okeh's fine race and hillbilly catalogs. Peer realized that Victor was several years too late to be able to get a substantial share of the classic blues market and decided to concentrate his efforts on the country blues field." Victor begin going in the field in a big way in 1927 stopping in Atlanta, Memphis and New Orleans.

Jug bands are synonymous with Memphis and Victor recorded two of the greatest groups: Memphis Jug Band and Cannon's Jug Stompers. The Memphis Victor CatalogJug Band first recorded for Victor in February 1927 and over the next four years recorded 57 sides. Hattie Hart had appeared on several of the Memphis Jug Band's discs in 1929 and 1930, singing the unforgettable "Memphis Yo Yo Blues", "Cocaine Habit Blues", "Oh Ambulance Man", "Papa's Got Your Bath Water On" and "Spider's Nest Blues." Her first recordings were made in Memphis for the Victor label in 1929. Three songs were recorded but only two were issued for her debut single. In 1934 she was recorded again in New York City in September of that year. She moved Chicago where in in 1938 she cut sides as Hattie Bolten.

In 1928 Ralph Peer, who had previously recorded the Memphis Jug Band, returned to Memphis looking for other jug bands to record. Charlie Williamson, the manager of the Palace Theater, recommended Gus Cannon. Gus called up Noah Lewis and Ashley Thompson and on Jan 30 1928 they recorded 4 sides in an old auditorium as Cannon's Jug Stompers. They recorded over two-dozen sides with the group through 1930 for Victor.

Noah Lewis was born in Henning, Tennessee, and raised in the vicinity of Ripley. He played in local string bands and brass bands, and began playing in the Ripley and Memphis areas with Gus Cannon. When jug bands became popular in the mid-1920's, he joined Cannon's Jug Stompers. He cut seven sides under his own name at sessions in 1929 and 1930. Recording as Noah Lewis' Jug Band, he was backed on two numbers by Sleepy John Estes and Yank Rachell with just Estes backing him on two other numbers cut a couple of days apart.

When the Victor recording company sent a field recording unit to Memphis in September 1929, Estes recorded several sides backed by the Three J's, with Jones playing piano instead of the jug. . He was invited to record again for Victor in May 1930. This session yielded the up-tempo "Milk Cow Blues," a tune Robert Johnson would later record as "Milkcow Calf Blues." In all the group cut fifteen sides, three were unissued, over the course of eight session in 1929 and 1930.

Frank Stokes was first recorded by Victor in 1927 with his "Downtown Blues" and "Bedtime Blues" selling well and when Victor returned to Memphis in August 1928 they recorded ten further selections. In 1929, Stokes and Sane recorded again for Paramount, resuming their 'Beale Street Sheiks' billing for a few cuts. In September, Stokes was back on Victor to make what were to be his last recordings, this time without Sane, but with Will Batts on fiddle.

catalog24Among the major artists recorded by Victor during these sessions were Bukka White, Memphis Minnie & Kansas Joe and Kokomo Arnold. In 1930 Bukka White met furniture salesman Ralph Limbo, who was also a talent scout for Victor. White traveled to Memphis where he made his first recordings, singing a mixture of blues and gospel material under the name of Washington White. Victor only saw fit to release four of the 14 songs Bukka White recorded that day.

Memphis Minnie's marriage and recording debut came in 1929, to and with Kansas Joe McCoy, when a Columbia Records talent scout heard them playing in a Beale Street barbershop. In 1930 Minnie recorded a pair of songs back by her friends, the Memphis Jug Band. She may also be on sides Jed Davenport and His Beale Street Jug Band cut that year.

Bukka White made his debut for Victor in 1930 and it may be Minnie's voice backing him on "I am In The Heavenly Way" b/ "Promise True And Grand."

Kokomo Arnold made his debut in 1930 although would not record again until he was in Chicago in 1934 where he recorded prolifically through 1938.

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ARTISTSONGALBUM
B.B. King LucilleLucille
B.B. King You Done Lost Your Good ThingMy Kind of Blues
B.B. King Walking Dr Bill My Kind of Blues
B.B. King Boogie Rock (aka House Rocker) The Soul Of B.B. King
B.B. King Night Life Blues Is King
B.B. King The JungleThe Jungle
B.B. King Don't Let It Shock You The Soul Of B.B. King
B.B. King My Own Fault My Kind of Blues
B.B. King Love, Honor and Obey The Soul Of B.B. King
B.B. King The Letter The Soul Of B.B. King
B.B. King Woke Up This Morning Singin' The Blues
B.B. King Woman I Love B.B. King Wails
B.B. King How Blue Can You Get?Live At The Regal
B.B. King When My Heart Beats Like A HammerThe Vintage Years
B.B. King Sweet Sixteen (Parts 1&2) The Vintage Years
B.B. King Sweet Little Angel Live At The Regal
B.B. King Why Does Everything Happen To MeThe Best of the Kent Singles
B.B. King That Ain't The Way To Do ItThe Vintage Years
B.B. King Baby Get Lost Blues Is King
B.B. King We Can't Make ItB.B. King Wails
B.B. King Gamblers Blues Blues Is King
B.B. King Shut Your Mouth More
B.B. King (Ain't That) Just Like a Woman More
B.B. King B.B. Boogie Ladies & Gentlemen ... Mr. B.B. King
B.B. KingSave A Seat For MeSings Spirituals

Show Notes:

The king of the blues, B.B. King, died on May 14th. My first blues album was B.B.'s Live At The Regal which I picked up for $3.99 at Tower Records in NYC. After that I started picking up those great reissue albums put out by Ace Records which collected his 50's sides. I'll be focusing on B.B.'s 50's and 60's sides today. Jazz 90.1 will honor B.B. King with a special 12 hour music vigil. Following my show, Jim McGrath (The Blues Spectrum), Derrick Lucas (The Soul Spectrum) and Paul Conley (Jazz Horizons) will all pay tribute to B.B. on their programs today beginning at 5 p.m. through Monday morning at 6 a.m. With the news of B.B.'s passing I did not have time to put together show notes.

B.B. King

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