Entries tagged with “Howlin’ Wolf”.

Memphis SlimBeer Drinking WomanBoogie After Midnight
Roosevelt SykesTrouble and WhiskeyThe Essential
Charlie SpandRock and RyeBooze & The Blues
Smoky BabeBad WhiskeyLouisiana Country Blues
Lil' Son JacksonBad Whiskey, Bad WomanDown Home Blues Classics: Texas
Sloppy HenryCanned Heat BluesAtlanta Blues
Big Bill BroonzyWhen I Been DrinkingBooze & The Blues
Blind Well McTellBell Street BluesThe Classic Years 1927-1940
Bo CarterLet's Get Drunk AgainThe Essential
Blind BlakeFighting The JugAll The Published Sides
Elder James BeckWine Head Willie Put that Bottle DownElder Charles Beck 1946-1947
Howlin' WolfDrinkin' C.V. WineMemphis Days Vol. 1
Roy Hawkins Wine Drinkin' WomanThe Thrill Is Gone
Papa George Lightfoot Wine, Women, WhiskeyRural Blues
James TisdomWinehead SwingTexas Down Home Blues 1948-1952
Bessie SmithMoonshine BluesThe Complete Recordings
Lucille BoganWhiskey Sellin' WomanLucille Bogan Vol.1 1923-1930
Harlem HamfatsLet's Get Drunk and TruckHarlem Hamfats Vol. 1 1936
State Street SwingersYou Drink Too MuchBooze & The Blues
Blind John DavisBooze Drinking BennyBlind John Davis 1938-1952
Sleepy John EstesDiving Duck BluesI Ain't Gonna Be Worried No More
Black AceWhiskey and WomenTexas Slide Guitars: Oscar "Buddy" Woods & Black Ace 1930-1938
Yank RachelHaven't Seen No WhiskeyYank Rachel ?Vol. 2 1938-41
Gene PhilipsStinkin' DrunkDrinkin' & Stinkin'
Boogie Bill WebbDrinkin' And Stinkin'Roosevelt Holts And Friends
Tommy JohnsonAlcohol and Jake Blues Blues Images Vol. 6
Skip JamesDrunken SpreeBlues Images Vol. 2
Robert JohnsonDrunken Hearted Man The Centennial Collection
Champion Jack Dupree You've Been DrunkEarly Cuts
Eddie 'Cleanhead' Vinson When I Get DrunkThe Mercury Blues & Rhythm Story
Bill Gaither Moonshine By The KegBooze & the Blues
Peetie Wheatstraw Good Whiskey Blues Booze & the Blues
Leroy Carr Hustler's Blues Whiskey Is My Habit, Women Is All I Crave

Show Notes:

Sloppy Henry - Canned Heat BluesAlcohol, marijuana, cocaine and other drugs pop up frequently as the subject of many blues. By far the subject of drinking comes up more than any of the other topics with hundred upon hundreds of songs written on all facets of drinking. Today we survey a wide variety blues songs about drinking, the majority from the pre-war era. Many of today's songs were recorded between 1920 and 1933, the era of Prohibition, which didn't seem to have any effect on those trying to find booze. Just sixteen days after the Volstead act made Prohibition the law of the land federal agents made their first raid on a speakeasy in Chicago. By the middle of the 1920's bootlegging became a two billion a year industry in which half a million people were employed. Prohibition became the topic of songs and in 1919, even before the law came into effect, vaudeville tenor Irving Kauffman sang "Prohibition drives me insane" in the "Alcoholic Blues." More than any other music, the pleasures and pains of booze were a common topic in blues songs. Drinking was tied to blues culture with the blues thriving in places known for drinking like brothels, lumber camps and juke joints.

Today's show title comes from Leroy Carr's number "Hustler's Blues" ("Whiskey is my habit, good woman is all I crave/And I don't believe them two things will carry me to my grave"). Between 1928 and 1935 Leroy Carr and his partner Scrapper Blackwell laid down a remarkably consistent body of work of hundreds of sides notable for the impeccable guitar/piano interplay. Carr sang numerous songs about booze including "Sloppy Drunk" which we featured last week, "Hard Times Done Drove Me To Drink", "Corn Licker Blues", "Papa Wants to Knock a Jug", and the prophetic "Straight Alky Blues Pt. 1-3" ('This alcohol is killing me/The doctor said if I don't quit it in a lonely graveyard I will be"). By the time of their final session together in February 1935, Carr's drinking was said to have made him practically unmanageable. He he sunk deeper and deeper into alcoholism which eventually cut his life short; he died in April 1935 just after his 30th birthday.

In the previous show we played Lonnie Johnson's "Drunk Again" in which he sings "People says drinkin' can help them, but drinkin' don't mean a thing/When you think you've drinked away your worries, and you find your fool self drunk again." In a similar sentiment we have Sloppy Henry's "Canned Heat Blues", Blind Willie McTell's "Bell Street Blues", Blind Blake's "Fighting The Jug" and the State Street Swingers "You Drink Too Much." Henry and McTelll echo similar complaints: Henry sings "Canned heat whiskey make you sleep all in your clothes, lay down in your clothes" while McTell sings that "This Bell Street whiskey, make you sleep all in your clothes." Blind Blake's "Fighting The Jug" has a sense of hopeless inevitability as he sings:

I can't sleep and I can't eat (2x)
The woman I love has drive me to drink

I'm deep in a hole somebody else has dug (2x)
Getting sick and tired of fighting that jug

From accounts of his life, Tommy Johnson faced a constant struggle with alcoholism which is reflected in his "Canned Heat Blues", featured last week, and his harrowing "Alcohol and Jake Blues" from 1929:

I drink so much of Jake, till it done give me the limber leg
(spoken: And that's sure to mess you up)
Drinking so much of Jake, till it done give me the limber leg
(spoken: Sure messes you up, boy, [there's no cure for] that)
If I don't quit drinking it every morning, sure gonna kill me dead (spoken: You ain't no lying man)

Black Ace - Whiskey and WomenWhen prohibition was on, people still needed a drink. Sometimes you could get bootleg alcohol, but sometimes you had to improvise from what you could get legally. There are quite a few prohibition-era songs about alcohol substitutes. One was Jamaica Ginger extract, known by the slang name "Jake," which was a late 19th-century patent medicine that provided a convenient way to bypass Prohibition laws, since it contained between 70-80% ethanol by weight. In 1930, large numbers of Jake users began to lose the use of their hands and feet. Some victims could walk, but they had no control over the muscles which would normally have enabled them to point their toes upward. Therefore, they would raise their feet high with the toes flopping downward, which would touch the pavement first followed by their heels. The toe first, heel second pattern made a distinctive “tap-click, tap-click" sound as they walked. This very peculiar gait became known as the jake walk and those afflicted were said to have jake leg, jake foot, or jake paralysis. The term "Jake" and "Canned Heat" turn up in other songs such as Will Shade's "Better Leave That Stuff Alone and  the Mississippi Sheiks' "Jake Leg Blues."Another alternative was Moonshine, the subject of numerous blues songs including Bessie Smith's "Moonshine Blues" from 1924 and Bill Gaither's "Moonshine By The Keg" featured today.

Back in the 1930's Elder Beck railed against booze in his song "Drinking Shine" and was back at in in the 1953 number "Wine Head Willie Put that Bottle Down" a novelty sketch that takes “Open the Door Richard” as its inspiration, pitting a minister against wayward sinner. Beck recorded some 60 recordings for a number of labels spanning the 1930's through the 1950's. In the pre-war era he recorded in 1930, 1937 and 1939. After the Second World War, with the rise of independent record labels, Elder Beck really hit his stride and between 1946 and 1956 he recorded for Eagle, Gotham, King, Chart and possibly other small labels. His final recording was a full-length live LP, Urban Holiness Service, made in December 1957 for Folkways.

Eleder Beck - Wine Head Willie Put That Bottle DownThere's no shortage of songs about whiskey, which seem to be the drink of choice when available although wine seems to be pretty popular as well. Peetie Wheatstraw's "Good Whiskey Blues" from 1935  is one of the few songs that mentions the repeal of the Prohibition act (in later years James Brewer revived the song as "I'm So Glad Good Whiskey's Back"). Other songs on the topic include Yank Rachel's "Haven't Seen No Whiskey", Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues" ("Now if the river was whiskey, I was a divin' duck/I would dive on the bottom, never would come up"), Black Ace's "Women and Whiskey", Lucille Bogan's "Whiskey Sellin' Woman", Papa George Lightfoot's "Wine, Women, Whiskey", Lil Son Jackson's "Bad Whiskey Bad Women" ("It's bad whiskey and bad women, oh man, 'bout to take me down/I wake up in the mornin' and I feel like a country clown"), Smoky Babe's "Bad Whiskey" and Roosevelt Sykes' "Trouble and Whiskey." Sticks McGhee McGhee had a smash with "Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee" in 1949 which James Tisdom covers on "Winehead Swing" from 1950 while Howlin' Wolf sings about "Drinkin' C.V. Wine" and Roy Hawkins sings about his "Wine Drinkin' Woman."

James Son Thomas & Eddie CusicLittle Red CarBlues At Home Vol. 10
Eddie CusicGonna Cut You LooseLiving Country Blues USA Vol. 2
Skip James Sick Bed BluesGreatest Of The Delta Blues Singers
Napoleon Strickland & Fred McDowellShake 'em on DownShake 'Em On Down
Lemon NashPapa Lemon's BluesPapa Lemon
Lemon NashGravedigger's BluesPapa Lemon
Lemon NashBowleg Rooster, Duckleg Hen / Sweet Georgia BrownPapa Lemon
Blind Willie JohnsonLord, I Just Can't Keep from CryingBlind Willie Johnson and the Guitar Evangelists
Son HouseThis Little Light Of Mine The Real Delta Blues
Peg Leg Sam I Got A Home Joshua
Roy Brown Butcher Pete Part 1Pay Day Jump The 1949-51
Roy Brown Butcher Pete Part 2Pay Day Jump The 1949-51
Tampa RedIf I Don't Find Another True LoveDynamite! The Unsung King Of The Blues
Tampa Red
I Got My Habits On
Dynamite! The Unsung King Of The Blues
Tampa RedEvalenaDynamite! The Unsung King Of The Blues
Scrapper BlackwellD BluesScrapper Blackwell Vol. 2 1934-1958
Leroy Carr & Scrapper BlackwellBig Four BluesWhiskey Is My Habit, Women Is All I Crave
Charlie PattonHigh Water Everywhere Part 1Blues Images Vol. 7
Charlie PattonHigh Water Everywhere Part 2Blues Images Vol. 7
Elmore JamesI Need YouKing of the Slide Guitar
Guitar SlimStory of My LifeSufferin' Mind
James WaltonLeaving BluesA Fortune Of Blues Vol. 2
Ma Rainey Log Camp Blues Mother of the Blues
Bertha ''Chippie'' HillHard Time Blues Bertha 'Chippie' Hill Vol. 1 1925-1929
Funny Papa Smith Seven Sisters Blues Part 1The Original Howling Wolf Sessions
Funny Papa Smith Seven Sisters Blues Part 2The Original Howling Wolf Sessions
Blind Boy FullerTell It To Me Blind Boy Fuller: Remastered 1935-1938
Leroy JohnsonNo One to Love MeTexas Country Blues 1948-1951
Howlin' Wolf Bluebird BluesSmokestack Lightning: The Complete Chess Masters
Robert Johnson Traveling Riverside Blues The Centennial Collection
Robert NighthawkFriar's Point Blues Prowling With The Nighthawk

Show Notes:

A mix show today as we travel through the 1920's up to the 60's touching on a wide variety of blues styles. On deck today are several two part blues songs including records by Charlie Patton, Funny Papa Smith and Roy Brown. Also featured are a some tracks by Eddie Cusic who recently passed away, a trio of tracks from the obscure New Orleans musician Lemon Nash, three sides by Tampa Red from a new reissue, some fine down-home blues, a pair of songs that share a similar geography and much more.

Eddie Cusic & James 'Son' Thomas 1976 Back cover of Albatros
album Mississippi Delta & South Tennessee Blues (photographer: Enzo Castella)

Eddie Cusic passed away on August 11th. Cusic was born in 1926 south of Leland, Mississippi. In the early 1950's, he formed a group called the Rhythm Aces that featured Little Milton. The group played the clubs in Greenville, Leland and in juke joints throughout the Delta. In the 1960's Cusic frequently teamed up with fellow Leland guitarist James "Son" Thomas, playing with him at picnics and other social events throughout the state. He stopped performing for awhile to provide for his family, returning to active performing after retiring from his quarry job in 1989. He became a mainstay at the Mississippi Delta Blues and Heritage Festival and at the Sunflower River Festival. Cusic left behind a small recorded legacy that includes one full-length album, I Want to Boogie cut for Hightone in 1997 and reissued on the Wolf label with extra tracks, plus field recordings made by Gianni Marcucci in the 1970's and Axel Küstner in the 1980's.

I was toying around withe idea of doing a show revolving around two-part songs which in the context of this show would mean both sides of the 78. We spin perhaps one of the greatest two-part 78's, Charley Patton's "High Water Everywhere", his epic about the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927. Paramount devoted an advertisement for the record with an illustration depicting a family sitting dejectedly on the porch of a shack, looking at the rising waters. The caption reads: "Everyone who has heard this record says that 'HIGH WATER EVERYWHERE' is Charley Patton's best and you know that means it has to be mighty good because he has made some knockouts."


Other two-parters  featured today include "Seven Sisters Blues" by J. T. "Funny Papa" Smith recorded in 1931. The Seven Sisters of New Orleans were said to be a family of hoodoo women who lived and practiced in the Crescent City in the 1920's and 30's. We also spin Roy Brown's salacious tale of "Butcher Pete" from 1949:

Hey everybody, did the news get around
About a guy named Butcher Pete
Oh, Pete just flew into this town
And he's choppin' up all the women's meat

He's hackin' and wackin' and smackin' (3x)
He just hacks, wacks, choppin' that meat

Tampa RedTampa Red
Read Liner Notes

I have been a huge fan of Tampa Red ever since picking up the wonderful 2-LP gatefold album, Guitar Wizard, which RCA released in the mid-70's. The album had a selection of sides from the 1930's through the 50's and a terrific set of notes by Jim O'Neal. O'Neal has provided another set of excellent notes to ACE's 2-CD Tampa Red reissue, Dynamite! The Unsung King Of The Blues. This set focuses on Tampa's final commercial period, the years 1945 through 1953, a period I've always been a fan of particularly the sides with pianist Little Johnny Jones who recorded with Tampa from 1949 through 1953. The tracks here have never sounded better, having been taken from master tapes and the original metal masters. The collection also contains four unissued sides including "I Got My Habits On", "Mary Lou Blues", "I Don’t Find Another True Love" and "Evalena", the latter two from his final session in 1953. I think this version of "Evalena" is superior to the issued take, showcasing magnificent playing from Walter Horton. Later in the program we hear from Tampa again, this time in a supporting role, backing Bertha "Chippie" Hill  on "Hard Time Blues" from 1928.

Friars Point is a small town in Coahoma County, Mississippi with an outsized role in blues history. Mississippi was one of only three states that continued prohibition after 1933 making Friars Point a popular weekend hangout because it was across the river from Helena, Arkansas where liqueur was legal and hence became an active bootlegging center. Another reason was there was curfew in Clarksdale, one of the Delta's main towns. Muddy Waters recalled: "Twelve O'Clock, you better be out of there, get off the streets. The great big police come down Sunflower street with that big cap on, man, waving that stick…That's why all this country stuff, people go out in the country. Friars Point'd go up to four o'clock in the morning, sometimes all night." Muddy Waters also said that the only time he saw Robert Johnson play was on the front porch of Hirsberg's Drugstore in Friars Point. In "Traveling Riverside Blues" Robert Johnson sang: "Just come on back to Friars Point, mama, and barrelhouse all night long/I got womens in Vicksburg, clean on into Tennessee (2x)/ But my Friar's Point rider, now, hops all over me." Friars Point seems to have been a regular stop on the circuit Delta bluesmen would travel from town to town through towns like Rosedale, Jackson, Clarksdale, Greenville and others. The Mississippi Blues Commission placed a Blues Trail marker in Friars Point in recognition of musician Robert Nighthawk, who at various times called Friars Point home and where one of his marriages took place. In 1940, Nighthawk recorded "Friars Point Blues", singing of "going back to Friars Point, down in sweet old Dixie Land." Nighthawk's son, drummer Sam Carr, was born in Friars Point.

Last year Arhoolie released a terrific CD by the little known Lemon Nash titled Papa Lemon. Born in 1898, Nash started on guitar, then violin, before turning to ukulele in his late teens. In the 1920's he signed on with a medicine show shilling blood tonic for an Indian chief and a legless cowboy where he honed both his music and comedy routines. Somewhere in these early years he played with the mysterious Richard "Rabbit" Brown (of whom he says: "Rabbit played so bad I had to let him go") who cut six sides for Victor in New Orleans in 1927. Nash's recordings were captured between 1956 and 1961 by both New Orleans jazz archivist Richard B Allen and folklorist Dr Harry Oster. Outside of these sides only a few other sides by Nash have been issued on the 504 record label which specialized in New Orleans jazz. Nash passed away in 1969, a virtual unknown outside his small circle of family and friends. Nash was a true songster playing a charming variety of traditional numbers including blues, pop and gospel.

Lemon NashWe play several heavy hitters on today's show including Son House and Skip James who both recorded legendary sessions for Paramount in the 1930's; House in 1930 and James in 1931, and both were rediscovered in 1964 and soon hit the blues revival circuit. In a couple of weeks I'll be doing a feature on Son House as our local theater is celebrating his legacy with an ambitious four-day event. Today's Skip James recording was recorded in 1964 in Falls Church, VA at the home of musicologist Dick Spotswood. These were James' first recordings since 1931. The sessions were completed the following year, issued in 1965 as Greatest Of The Delta Blues Singers, first on on Spotswood's Melodeon label then on the Biograph label which acquired Melodeon in 1970.

Jimmy And Mama Yancey Monkey Woman Blues Chicago Blues Piano Vol. 1
Otis Spann It Must Have Been The Devil Genesis: Beginnings Of Rock Vol. 3
Al Winter Boogie 88 Hollywood Boogie: Obscure Piano Blues & Boogie Woogie From Los Angeles
Mable Hillery Lonesome Road It's So Hard To Be A Nigger
Mable Hillery Mr. President It's So Hard To Be A Nigger
Jimmy WitherspoonBig Family Blues 1950s R&B From Dolphin's Vol. 2; Toast Of The Coast
Tony AllenYou're A Mean And Evil Woman 1950s R&B From Dolphin's Vol. 1; On With The Jive
Lucille Bogan and Papa Charlie Jackson Jim Tampa Blues Papa Charlie Done Sung That Song
Laura DukesBricks In My PillowTennessee Blues Vol. 1
Elmore James Strange Angels Something Inside Of Me
Wild Jimmy Spruill Hard GrindScratchin': Wild Jimmy Spruill Story
Guitar Gable Long Way from HomeRhythm 'n' Bluesin' By The Bayou: Mad Dogs, Sweet Daddies & Pretty Babies
Pee Wee CraytonRockin the Blues Texas Blues Jumpin' In Los Angeles: The Modern Music Sessions 1948-51
John Lee Hooker I Don't Be Welcome HereThe Complete1948-51 Vol. 3
Blind Joe Hill Highway 13 First Chance
Jimmy Reed I'm Just Trying To Cop A Plea Soulin'
Tampa Red I Still Got California On My MindThe Bluebird Recordings 1934-1936
Lane HardinCalifornia Desert Blues Blues Images Vol. 9
Jesse Thomas Gonna Move to California Jesse Thomas 1948-1958
Lawyer Houston Out In CaliforniaLightning Hopkins: Lightning Special Vol. 2
Howlin' WolfCalifornia BoogieSmokestack Lightning: The Complete Chess Masters
Johnny WoodsSo Many Cold MorningsSo Many Cold Mornings
John Tinsley Cotton Picking BluesCountry Blues Roots Revisted
Walter Davis Strange Land BluesWalter Davis 1930-1932
Roy HawkinsStrange LandBad Luck Is Falling
Roger (Burn Down) GarnettLighthouse BluesThe Frog Blues And Jazz Annual No. 1
Dorothy Everetts Macon Blues The Frog Blues And Jazz Annual No. 1
Irene Wiley Bo Hog BluesThe Frog Blues And Jazz Annual No. 1
Jimmy RushingSomebody's Spoiling These WomenBlues & Gospel Kings Vol. 4

Show Notes:

ctf10024 (1)
Read Liner Notes

A wide ranging mix show today  including songs a pair of sides by singer Mabel Hillery, sets of piano blues, some heavy duty guitar slingers, a pair of sets revolving around specific lyrical themes, music from the vaults of King Records and west coast record man John Dolphin and a batch of outstanding early pre-war blues sides.

Shortly after the death of folklorist Tary Owens on September 21, 2003, Brad Buchholz, wrote that, “Tary Owens devoted most of his life to music, though only rarely to his own. The greater mission, to Owens, was to champion the music of forgotten or unsung Texas bluesmen—to put their songs on records, to place them on a stage, to encourage a larger public to celebrate their artistry.” Owens operated the Catfish and Spindletop labels issuing some fine recordings of neglected Texas artists. We spotlight two tracks from Texas Piano Professors by little recorded piano men Dr. Hepcat, Grey Ghost and Erbie Bowser. I want to thank Gerrit Robs for making this album available to me.

We spin a trio of tracks from the Frog Blues And Jazz Annual No. 1, which I recently picked up along with the second and third issues. The magazine does a great job filling the hole left by the late lamented 78 Quarterly. The Annuals are something between a magazine and a softbound book, roughly 8.5 inches by 11.75 inches with 178 pages. They are edited (and  contributed to) by Paul Swinton, owner of Great Britain’s Frog Records, one of the  premier prewar jazz and jazz/blues reissue record companies. Each Annual comes with a companion CD featuring 26 cuts that reflect the articles in the Annual.  Most of the blues tracks have appeared on other collections, but Roger Garnett's marvelous "Lighthouse Blues" (recorded for the Library of Congress in 1939) and Irene Wiley's fantastic "Bo Hog Blues" (with a probable late 1940's recording date) have not been issued before. We also spin Dorothy Everetts terrific "Macon Blues" from her lone 1928 78 record.

A member of The Georgia Sea Island Singers (she joined in 1961), Mable Hillery was less known than leader, Big John Davis or Bessie Jones, who also had her own performing career. Between 1961 and 1965 she toured the college circuit of campuses, coffee houses, church basements, and festivals, from Berkeley to Philadelphia, from the Ash Grove in Los Angeles to the Café à Go-Go in New York City. Hillery was very active in civil rights issues during the 60's. In 1968, after touring in England, where she did TV and concert dates, Hillery made a her only album for the record label Xtra, It's So Hard To Be A Nigger, which has never been issued on CD. This is a (The Frog Blues And Jazz Annual No. 1)wonderful record and Hillery was a tremendously expressive singer. The acapella title track sounds like a lost field recording by the Lomax's or Lawrence Gellert. A few other sides by her appear on various anthologies. She died at the age of 46 in 1976. 

We spin several songs with lyrical themes including several revolving around "California" and several using the title "Strange Land." In 1936 Robert Johnson famously sang the lines "But I'm cryin' hey baby, Honey don't you want to go/Back to the land of California, to my sweet home Chicago." This line always seemed a bit confusing too me but I think many blues singers viewed California as an idyllic, almost mystical place far from the Jim Crow south. From 1934 we spin Tampa Red's jaunty "I Still Got California On My Mind", Lane Hardin's "California Desert Blues" ("When I reach old Los Angeles, Californy, you oughta heard me jump and shout"),  Jesse Thomas' "Gonna Move to California", Howlin' Wolf's "California Boogie" and "Out In California" by Lawyer Houston:

Well I'm going out on Central
Going to get me a room at the hotel Dunbar
And then I'm going out to Hollywood to become a movie star

"Way out in California, that's where I long to be" sings Walter Davis in "Strange Land Blues." Roy Hawkins cut the doomy "Strange Land" in 1948 and updated it 1961.

We spin three tracks from the series Blues & Gospel Kings which spotlight early blues and gospel from King records. There are four volumes in the series spanning the years 1945 through 1952. Founded by Syd Nathan in 1943, King Records was one of the most influential independent labels of the 1940s and 1950s. By the end of the latter decade, it had become the nation's sixth largest record company. The label originally specialized in country music and." King advertised, "If it's a King, It's a Hillbilly – If it's a Hillbilly, it's a King." The company also had a "race records" label, Queen Records (which was melded into the King label within a year or two) and most notably (starting in 1950) Federal Records which launched the singing career of James Brown. In the 1950s, this side of the business outpaced the hillbilly recordings.

We also feature tracks from west coast record man John Dolphin and King Records. The legendary John Dolphin, also known as Lovin’ John, was one of the first and most well respected, black business man who made his way in the music business of Los Angeles in the 1940s and 50s. Dolphin first entered the music business as a retailer where in 1948, when he opened Dolphin’s of Hollywood, a record store on Vernon Avenue that would stay open 24 hours a day.The store featured deejays broadcasting on the local station of KRKD, in front of the huge, glass window. In 1950, John Dolphin mounted his own label, Recorded In Hollywood, eventually selling the label to Decca. Dolphin launched follow-up labels including Lucky, Money and Cash. In 1958 Dolphin was shot and killed by a disgruntled songwriter. The Ace label has issued two volumes of recordings made by Dolphin: On With The Jive! 1950s R&B From Dolphin's Of Hollywood Vol. 1 and Toast Of The Coast: 1950s R&B From Dolphin's Of Hollywood Vol. 2.

Mabel Hillery
Read Liner Notes

We play a set of guitar heavy hitters today, most from some recent reissues. The track by Wild Jimmy Spruill comes from a great 2-CD set, Scratchin’: The Wild Jimmy Spruill Story. After arriving in New York in 1955 Spruill went on to play guitar on a staggering number of records notably for Bobby and Danny Robinson’s group of labels, including Fire, Fury, Enjoy, Everlast and Vim. He also cut some terrific sides under his own name. Our Pee wee Crayton cut comes from Texas Blues Jumpin' In Los Angeles: The Modern Music Sessions 1948-51, the third CD on the Ace label of Crayton's Modern sides. "Long Way From Home" by Guitar Gable comes from another recent Ace reissue, Rhythm 'n' Bluesin' By The Bayou: Mad Dogs, Sweet Daddies & Pretty Babies the tenth volume in the “By The Bayou” series, pulling sides from the  vaults of J.D. Miller’s Crowley studio.


John Lee HookerGreat Fire Of NatchezNewport Folk Festival: Best of the Blues
John Lee HookerBus Station Blues Newport Folk Festival: Best of the Blues
Mississippi Fred McDowell, Annie Mae McDowell & Rev. Robert WilkinsWhat Do You Think About JesusBlues With A Feeling
Mississippi Fred McDowellLord I'm Going Down SouthThe Blues at Newport 1964
Rev. Gary DavisSamson and DelilahRev. Gary Davis At Newport
Rev. Gary DavisYou Got to Move Rev. Gary Davis At Newport
Mississippi John HurtSpikedriver Blues Newport Folk Festival 1963
Mississippi John HurtStagolee Newport Folk Festival 1963
Mississippi John HurtTrouble, I've Had It All My Days Live Oberlin College & Newport '63
Skip JamesSick Bed BluesBlues At Newport 1964
Skip JamesHard Time Killing Floor Blues Newport Folk Festival: Best of the Blues
Son House Death Letter BluesNewport Folk Festival: Best of the Blues
Son House Son's BluesBlues With A Feeling
Son House w/ Mance LipscombPony BluesGreat Bluesmen Newport
Muddy WatersWalkin' Blues Blues With A Feeling
Muddy WatersFlood Newport Folk Festival: Best of the Blues
Muddy WatersI'm Your Hoochie Coochie ManAt Newport 1960
Doc Reese Hey RattlerThe Blues at Newport 1964
Elizabeth CottonFreight trainThe Blues at Newport 1964
Mance LipscombFreddieBlues With A Feeling
Lightnin' HopkinsMojo Hand Live At Newport
Jesse FullerSan Francisco Bay BluesBlues With A Feeling
Jesse FullerDouble Double Do Love YouNewport Folk Festival: Best of the Blues
Robert Pete WilliamsThe Prodigal SonThe Prodigal Son
Brownie McGhee & Sonny Terry Key To The HighwayBlues At Newport 1963
Sleepy John EstesCleanup At HomeBlues at Newport
Howlin' Wolf Dust My BroomDevil Got My Woman: Blues at Newport 1966
Howlin' Wolf Meet Me In The BottomDevil Got My Woman: Blues at Newport 1966

Show Notes:

Robert Wilkins Newport 1964
Rev. Robert Wilkins, Newport, 1964

The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival in Newport, Rhode Island, which began in 1959 as a counterpart to the previously established Newport Jazz Festival. The Newport Folk Festival was founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, backed by its original board: Theodore Bikel, Oscar Brand, Pete Seeger and Albert Grossman. The festival in its initial guise ran from 1959 to 1970, with no festivals scheduled in 1961 or 1962. The festival was revived in 1985. The festival's beginning in 1959 parallel the blues revival period and all of the great rediscovered bluesman appeared at the festival. The first bluesmen to appear at the festival were Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee in 1959. Others who performed at Newport include Muddy Waters, who issued a live album of their 1960 performance, John Lee Hooker, Mississippi Fred McDowell, Rev. Robert Wilkins, Sleepy John Estes, Robert Pete Williams, Lightnin' Hopkins and many others. Today is part two of or look at the great blues performances of Newport in particular chronological order. The following information comes from the book Blues Music in the Sixties A Story in Black and White by Urlich Adelt.

"Even during the hiatus of folk song enthusiasm in the 1950s, a small group of connoisseurs kept promoting the music and helped to prepare for the full-scale folk revival between 1958 and 1965. 20 The folk music magazine Sing Out! was launched in 1950 as a small-scale operation and would grow into a formidable publication in the 1960s. Harry Smith’s six-disc Anthology of American Folk Music, which featured commercial recordings of blues, gospel, and string band music from the 1920s and 1930s, came out on Folkways in 1952 and would serve as an inspiration for many emerging folk musicians in the 1960s and as an impetus to rediscover the musicians featured on the recordings.

The Newport Folk Festival was one of the main catalysts of the 1960's folk revival. The showcasing of rediscovered blues artists, in particular in the years between 1963 and 1965, aptly demonstrates the emergence of a distinctive white blues fan culture that drew from notions of folk authenticity developed in nineteenth-century Europe and refined by the folk revivalists. …The Newport Folk Festival also revealed a particular form of antimodern blues purism, which entailed a nostalgic rediscovery of and hunt for prewar black musicians. This purism would eventually clash with the diluted but not necessarily less racialist white notions of blues authenticity represented by the plugging in of Mike Bloomfield and others.

Howlin' Wolf Newport 1966
Howlin Wolf with Hubert Sumlin on Guitar,
Newport Folk Festival (1966) by David Gahr

Although the first two Newport Folk Festivals in 1959 and 1960 were financial disasters, they drew about twelve thousand people each, an impressive number for the time. …The financial problems of both the jazz and the folk festival and the raucous crowds at the jazz festival in 1960 forced the organizers to cancel the folk festival in 1961 and 1962. …After the two-year hiatus, the Newport Folk Festival became a nonprofit operation in 1963. Among the board members of the newly established Newport Folk Foundation were George Wein, Pete Seeger, and Alan Lomax. The foundation’s mission was 'to promote and stimulate interest in the arts associated with folk music.' In addition to organizing the festival, this included fostering folk music and material culture in the field and in schools. Ralph Rinzler, another member of the board of directors, worked as talent and folklore coordinator and would seek out potential performers for the festival in rural regions of the United States and Canada.In an attempt to democratize the festival, each participant would receive a standard fee of fifty dollars (regardless of popularity) as well as travel and food reimbursements. The directors invited a larger number of amateur musicians, more women and musicians from a wider musical spectrum.

Interestingly, although the blues was racially coded as black or of black origin at Newport, much of the music in question was a nostalgic rehash of styles dating back to the 1920s and 1930s fraught with essentialist notions of blackness, and therefore few black people attended the concerts. Blues performers had only represented a small part of the lineup at the first two Newport Folk Festivals, but they became one of the major attractions in the years between 1963 and 1965 and contributed to a genre that fans could separate from folk music."