Entries tagged with “Cousin Joe”.



ARTISTSONGALBUM
Smiley Lewis Here Comes SmileyBeef Ball Baby
Dud Bascomb Somebody's KnockingDud and Paul Bascomb 1945-1947
The Four BluesThe Blues Can JumpVocal Groups: Classic Doo Wop
Cousin JoeIt's Dangerous To Be A HusbandCousin Joe Vol. 2 1946-1947
Cousin JoePhoney Woman BluesCousin Joe Vol. 2 1946-1947
Roy BrownSpecial Lesson No. 1Good Rockin' Brown
Roy BrownMiss Fanny BrownGood Rockin' Brown
Roy BrownWhose Hat Is ThatGood Rockin' Brown
Kirby Walker When My Love Comes Tumbling Down 78
Al Stomp Russell Trio Down The Road A Piece78
Paul GaytenHey Little GirlCreole Gal
Paul GaytenPeter Blue And Jasper TooCreole Gal
Paul GaytenYour Hands Ain't CleanCreole Gal
Dave BartholomewMr. FoolDave Bartholomew 1947-50
Dave BartholomewGirt Town BluesDave Bartholomew 1947-50
Dave BartholomewCountry BoyDave Bartholomew 1947-50
Chubby "Hip Shakin'" NewsomeChubby's ConfessionBeef Ball Baby
Chubby "Hip Shakin'" NewsomeBack-Bitin' WomanBeef Ball Baby
Little Miss Cornshucks Cornshucks' BluesLittle Miss Cornshucks 1947-1951
Annie LaurieAnnie's BluesJump 'N' Shout
Erline HarrisJump and ShoutJump 'N' Shout
King Perry Goin'To California BluesKing Perry 1945-1949
Eddie Gorman Telephone BluesBeef Ball Baby
Pee Wee HughesSanta FeJook Joint Blues
Pee Wee HughesCountry BoyDown Home Blue Classics 1943-1953
Fats Pichon (I'm Gonna Move) To The Outskirts Of Town Deep South Boogie
Sherman Williams Dusk TideSherman Williams 1947-1951
Roy BrownHard Luck BluesGood Rockin' Brown
Roy BrownLove Don't NobodyGood Rockin' Brown
Roy BrownBoogie At MidnightGood Rockin' Brown

Show Notes:

This series of shows revolves around three independent labels that issued some fine blues and R&B sides, among other music, in the 1940's and 50's. The labels are linked by the Braun brothers who first ran De Luxe, then formed the Regal imprint with Fred Mendelsohn, and Mendelsohn in turn formed the Herald label after Regal ended operations. In addition Mendelsohn was involved with De Luxe for a short time after it was picked up by King Records. De Luxe and Regal not surprisingly shared some of the same artists, in fact Regal picked up exactly where DeLuxe had left off on their numbering, at 3229. While Regal recorded several more down home blues artists, De Luxe's blues oriented recordings fall mainly into the R&B mold.

On this first show we start with recordings from the De Luxe vaults. In John Broven's Record Makers and Breakers he provides this snapshot of the label: “De Luxe Records was a pioneering label formed in 1944 by the Braun brothers, David and Jules, out of Linden, New Jersey, and it released everything from race music, gospel, and jazz to pop and polka. The biggest artist was Roy Brown, whose breakthrough hit, “Good Rocking Tonight” (No. 13 race in 1948), was covered lucratively by Wynonie Harris for King (No. 1 race); New Orleanians Paul Gayten and Annie Laurie were other good-selling 1940s acts. Before long, cash flow problems forced the Brauns into the arms of the wily Nathan, and after a troubled liaison, a bitter legal battle ensued. With the ubiquitous Jack Pearl leading the charge, Syd Nathan acquired full control of the De Luxe assets in 1951.” Many of the De Luxe masters were issued on King singles and albums. In the early 1950's, Syd Nathan revived the label with new releases as a subsidiary of King.

Tony Rounce noted that De Luxe "adopted a pan-American approach to building their catalog. Many of their early successes were recorded in New York City – a stone's throw from Linden – but by 1946 they were recording in many other locations, including Los Angeles and Charlotte, North Carolina. In February 1947 they went south to New Orleans for the first time…" Today's show will spotlight recordings made for De Luxe when the Braun brothers ran the label, and the show bounces through the catalog non-chronologically.

In February 1947 the Brauns headed south to New Orleans for the first time cutting sessions sessions by veteran singer/pianist "Fats" Pinchon and the Cajun band of Luderin Darbone. They were aided by local singer/pianist Paul Gayten, who they later signed as an artist in his own right, and placed in charge of thier local R&B A&R activity. Gayten, a seminal figure in New Orleans rhythm & blues, led a varied career in the music business as a bandleader, producer, label owner, and one-time overseer of the West Coast operation of Chess Records. A nephew of blues-piano legend Little Brother Montgomery, Gayten once led one of the top bands of New Orleans, but he gave up the performing life in 1956 to turn his attention to production and eventually to his own California-based Pzazz label. Gayten wrote Larry Darnell's 1949 classic "For You My Love" and recorded a few Top Ten hits of his own for De Luxe and Regal (1947-1950), some of them with vocalist Annie Laurie.

De Luxe's biggest New Orleans success was Roy Brown. Born in the Crescent City, Brown grew up all over the place: Eunice, LA (where he sang in church and worked in the sugarcane fields); Houston, TX; and finally Los Angeles by age 17. His seminal 1947 DeLuxe Records waxing of "Good Rockin' Tonight" was immediately ridden to the peak of the R&B charts by shouter Wynonie Harris and subsequently covered by Elvis Presley, Ricky Nelson, Jerry Lee Lewis, and many more early rock icons. Roy Brown didn't have to wait long to dominate the R&B lists himself. He scored 15 hits from mid-1948 to late 1951 for DeLuxe.

Other notable New Orleans artists include Dave Bartholomew and Smiley Lewis. Bartholomew was a bandleader, trumpet player, songwriter, producer, arranger, talent scout, businessman, and more. Bartholomew is most famous for having discovered and produced Fats Domino, with whom he produced and wrote songs for through the Fifties and beyond. But he’s worked with a who’s-who of New Orleans R&B figures: Smiley Lewis, Lloyd Price, Shirley & Lee, Earl King, Roy Brown, Huey "Piano" Smith, Chris Kenner, Robert Parker, Frankie Ford, James Booker, Jewel King, James "Sugar Boy" Crawford, Tommy Ridgley and more. In the late 40s, he formed his own band, which became one of the most popular and accomplished in the city. Between 1947 and the early 60’s Bartholomew recorded prolifically under his own name mostly for Imperial but also for Deluxe, Aladdin, Specialty, King and Jax. His records featured the cream of New Orleans musicians.

Music historian Tony Russell wrote that Smiley "Lewis was the unluckiest man in New Orleans. He hit on a formula for slow-rocking, small-band numbers like 'The Bells Are Ringing' and 'I Hear You Knocking' only to have Fats Domino come up behind him with similar music more ingratiatingly delivered. Lewis was practically drowned in Domino's backwash. Lewis formed a trio with the drummer Herman Seals and painist Tuts Washington. The trio was invited by David Braun to record a session with his De Luxe Records in 1947, which produced Lewis's debut record, "Here Comes Smiley" with the single "Turn On Your Volume" a local jukebox hit. Despite the hit, DeLuxe let Smiley sign on with Imperial to great success.

Cousin Joe had success in New York before returning to his hometown of New Orleans were DeLuxe found him. Growing up in New Orleans, Cousin Joe began singing in church before crossing over to the blues. Guitar and ukulele were his first axes. He eventually prioritized the piano instead, playing Crescent City clubs and riverboats. He moved to New York in 1942, gaining entry into the city's thriving jazz scene (where he played with Dizzy Gillespie, Sidney Bechet, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, and a host of other luminaries). He recorded for King, Gotham, Philo (in 1945), Savoy, and Decca along the way, doing well on the latter logo with "Box Car Shorty and Peter Blue" in 1947. After returning to New Orleans in 1948, he recorded for De Luxe and cut a two-part "ABC's" for Imperial in 1954 as Smilin' Joe under Dave Bartholomew's supervision. But by then, his recording career had faded.

Among the fine lesser knowns,  we feature fine sides by The Four Blues, Kirby Walker, Al Stomp Russell, Chubby "Hip Shakin"' Newsome and Erline Harris. The Four Blues formed circa 1939-1940 and started recording for Decca in 1940. In 1945 they signed on with DeLuxe and after made sides sides for Apollo in the late 40's. Kirby Walker, was a vocalist/pianist who was based in New York City. In 1946 he made two records with Leonard Feather's group for De Luxe. In 1949 he manned his own piano and cut two more singles for Columbia with his own group. Pianist Al Stomp Russell recorded for several labels in the 40's such as Coast, Excelsior, 20th Century, Sapphire, Queen, Apollo, King and three records for De Luxe in 1947. Chubby Newsome was originally from Detroit but found recognition in New Orleans where she was a regular performer in the late 1940's. She was discovered by Paul Gayten at the famous Dew Drop Inn. She was soon signed to the De Luxe label where she recorded her signature tune "Hip Shakin' Mama", and also "He May Be Your Man" with Gayten's band. Newsome signed with Regal in 1949 cutting several sessions for the label in the early 50's. Erline Harris signed with De Luxe Records in February 1949 and recorded several singles for the record label with some sides appearing later on Regal.

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ARTISTSONGALBUM
Hal Singer & Carl Davis I Feel So GoodHal Singer 1948-1951
Hal SingerDisc Jockey BoogieHal Singer 1948-1951
Wynonie Harris w/ Frank Culley & Hal Singer I Feel That Old Age Coming OnRockin' The Blues
Ruth Brown w/ Freddie MitchellI Would If I CouldI'm A Bad, Bad Girl
Eunice Davis & Freddie Mitchell OrchestraRock Little DaddyBaby, That's Rock 'n' Roll
Freddie Mitchell Rockin' With CoopFreddie Mitchell 1949-1950
Big Joe Turner w/ Sam Taylor In The EveningThe Rhythm & Blues Years
Bull Moose Jackson w/ Sam TaylorCherokee BoogieThe Big Horn: Honkin' And Screamin' Saxophone
Bull Moose Jackson w/ Red PrysiockBig Ten Inch RecordThe R&B Hits Of 1952
Wynonie Harris w/ Red Prysiock -Down Boy DownLovin' Machine
Red Prysock Jump Red, JumpHandclappin' Foot Stompin'
Willis JacksonGood To The BoneFire/Fury Records Story
Eddie Mack w/ Willis Jackson Mercenary PapaEddie Mack 1947-1952
Big Joe Turner w/ Al Sears Ti - Ri – LeeThe Rhythm & Blues Years
Nappy Brown w/ Big Al SearsWell Well Well Baby LaNight Time Is The Right Time
Big Al SearsMarshall PlanThe Big Horn: Honkin' And Screamin' Saxophone
King CurtisMovin' On King's Rock
Mr. Bear & The Bearcats w/ Sam Taylor & King CurtisMr. Bear Comes To TownHonkin' 'N' Hollerin'
Sammy Price w/ King CurtisRib Joint Rib Joint
Ruth Brown w/ Budd JohnsonI KnowRuth Brown 1949-1950
Mabel Scott w/ Budd JohnsonCatch 'Em Young, Treat 'Em Rough, Tell 'Em NothingMabel Scott 1951-1955
Edna McGriff w/ Buddy Lucas Edna's BluesI'm A Bad, Bad Girl
Buddy Lucas High Low JackStill Groove Jumping
Paul “Hucklebuck” WilliamsWomen Are the Root of All Evil Paul Williams Vol. 3 1952-1956
Paul “Hucklebuck” WilliamsThe Hucklebuck (Hucklebuck)Paul Williams Vol. 2 1949-1952
Paul “Hucklebuck” WilliamsYoung Man BluesPaul Williams Vol. 2 1949-1952
Noble “Thin Man” Watts Jookin'Fire/Fury Records
Margie Day w/ Noble “Thin Man” Watts Take Out Your False Teeth DaddyJumpin' The Blues Vol. 2
Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson w/ Buddy Tate Queen Bee Blues Honk For Texas
Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson Bald Head Blues Honk For Texas
Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson Mr. Cleanhead Steps OutHonk For Texas
Cousin Joe w/ Earl Bostic Fly Hen BluesCousin Joe Vol. 1 1945-1947
Earl BosticLet's Ball Tonight - Part 1Earl Bostic 1945-48
Earl BosticEarl Blows A FuseEarl Bostic Blows a Fuse

Show Notes:

Hal "Cornbread" Singer

Today's show is a part one of our look at some great New York based sax men who's honkin' sound was heard on hundreds of records in the 40's and 50's. This show is one of several sax based shows this year starting a few months ago with a two-part show of Chicago horn men , followed by two spotlighting some great L.A. Horn blowers. Illinois Jacquet is cited as the one who kicked off the era of honkin' sax in 1945 with his famous solo on "Flying Home" while working with Lionel Hampton's band. As Big Jay McNeely said of of the song, "every time we picked up our horns we were just elaborating on that, trying to make it bigger, wilder, give it more swing, more kick. If you want to know where rhythm and blues began, that's it brother."  Today we spin some great honkin' sax records, some cut by the horn men themselves and others featuring their raucous playing behind some great blues singers, both well known and obscure. The records were issued on a myriad of small New York independent labels labels such as Atlas, Derby, Coral,  Apollo, Groove, Fire/Fury, Savoy and bigger players such as King and Atlantic. Along the way we'll hear some exciting instrumentals and hear them back some terrific blues singers, both famous like Wynonie Harris, Big Joe Turner and Ruth Brown, to the obscure such as Eddie Mack, Mr. Bear and Edna McGriff. Among those featured today are legendary horn men such as Hal Singer and Freddie Mitchell who played on countless sessions as well as recording some exciting sides under their own names. Then there were sax men primarily know for their session work such as the prolific Sam “The Man” Taylor, Budd Johnson and Big Al Sears. There were the sax men who led their own bands and were stars in their own right such as Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson, Paul “Hucklebuck” Williams, Red Prysock, Earl Bostic and Bullmoose Jackson. Others heard today include the incendiary Noble “Thin Man” Watts, the rising star King Curtis, Willis “Gator” Jackson, Buddy Lucas, Frank Culley and others. On part two we'll spin more great tracks by theses sax men as well as hearing form others such as Sil Austin, Buddy Tate, Charlie Singleton and more. We'll provide some background on some of today's artists and fill in details about the rest next week.

If you pour through the session details of the hundreds of New York City R&B sessions that took place in the mid-40's through the 50's you'll run across several sax men time and again, including Hal Singer, Freddie Mitchell, Sam "The Man" Taylor, Big Al Sears  and Budd Johnson. Hal Singer played with the legendary South Western and Mid Western territory bands of T Holder, Ernie Fields, Tommy Douglas and Jay McShann. He lent his torrid tenor saxophone style to R&B hits from Wynonie Harris' "Good Rockin' Tonight" in 1947 to Little Willie John's "Talk To Me, Talk To Me" in 1958, and conducted his own successful recording career from 1948, kicking off with "Cornbread" – a title that would provide his nickname for the next several years. Singer formed his own quartet, which played on some blues sessions for Savoy Records eventually recording signing a contract with the label in 1948 which lasted until 1949. He would record again for the label for a longer term from 1952 to1956 – and in the meantime Singer recorded for Mercury (1950) and Coral (1951/52), as well as playing back-up on countless R&B and rock 'n' roll sessions. rom the late 1950s into the early 1960s, in addition to touring extensively with many jazz, R&B and rock 'n' roll package shows, Singer recorded for DeLuxe and Prestige and between 1958 and 1961 he played in the famous New York club Metropole with Roy Eldridge, Coleman Hawkins, Charlie Shavers, Henry "Red" Allen, Cozy Cole and Claude Hopkins.

Paul “Hucklebuck” Williams

Born in Orlando, Florida, in 1918, young Freddie Mitchell became a blues pianist in nearby Tampa before moving to New York City with his family at about 13 years of age. Upon leaving high school he joined Benny Carter's Orchestra in late 1940 and in 1941 joined Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra and also briefly played with Hot Lips Page and Louis Armstrong.  By 1949 Mitchell was approached by Larry Newton, owner of Derby Records, to be a contracted artist and the in-house bandleader. Leaving Derby after three years, Mitchell recorded for Mercury (1952), Coral, Brunswick and Gem (1953), Jubilee (1954), Rock 'n' Roll (1955), ABC Paramount (1956-61) and a one-off session for Herb Abramson in 1959. y 1952 he had become a top New York session musician and can be heard on many hits, particularly those from Atlantic: Joe Turner's "Sweet Sixteen", Ray Charles' "It Should've Been Me", Ruth Brown's "Wild, Wild Young Men" and LaVern Baker's "Soul On Fire" to name a fraction.

Sam Taylor began working with Scat Man Crothers and the Sunset Royal Orchestra in the late '30s. He played with Cootie Williams and Lucky Millinder in the early '40s, then worked six years with Cab Calloway. Taylor toured South America and the Caribbean during his tenure with Calloway. Taylor began to get work as a session musician in 1952 and did work for Atlantic, Savoy, and Apollo Records. In November of that year he was signed by former MGM record man Joe Davis who has a stable of labels including Beacon, Joe Davis, and Jay-Dee. Taylor became the saxophonist of choice for many R&B dates through the '50s, recording with Ray Charles, Buddy Johnson, Louis Jordan, and Big Joe Turner, among others.

Al Sears had actually had his first important job in 1928 replacing Hodges with the Chick Webb band. However, despite associations with Elmer Snowden (1931-1932), Andy Kirk (1941-1942), Lionel Hampton (1943-1944), and with his own groups (most of 1933-1941), it was not until Sears joined Duke Ellington's Orchestra in 1944 that he began to get much attention. Sears worked with Johnny Hodges' group during 1951-1952, recorded a variety of R&B-oriented material in the 1950s backing artists such as Big Joe Turner, Nappy Brown, Piano Red, Cousin Joe and others. He cut two excellent albums for Swingville in 1960 before going into semi-retirement.

Eddie “Cleanhead” Vinson

In the 1920's Budd Johnson performed in Texas and parts of the Midwest, working with Jesse Stone among others. Johnson had his recording debut while working with Louis Armstrong's band in 1932-33 but he is more known for his work, over many years, with Earl Hines. Johnson was also an early figure in the bebop era, doing sessions with Coleman Hawkins in 1944. In the 1950s he led his own group and did session work for Atlantic Records – he is the featured tenor saxophone soloist on Ruth Brown's hit "Teardrops from My Eyes."

Several sax men spent time leading their own bands and became quite famous during this era. Among those were Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson, Paul “Hucklebuck” Williams and Earl Bostic. Eddie Vinson first picked up a horn while attending high school in Houston. During the late '30s, he was a member of an incredible horn section in Milton Larkins's orchestra, sitting next to Arnett Cobb and Illinois Jacquet. Vinson joined the Cootie Williams Orchestra from 1942 to 1945. His vocals on trumpeter Williams' renditions of "Cherry Red" and "Somebody's Got to Go" were big hits. Vinson struck out on his own in 1945, forming his own large band, signing with Mercury, and enjoying a double-sided smash in 1947 with "Old Maid Boogie" and  "Kidney Stew Blues." Between 1949-1952 he did a stint at King Records.  Vinson steadfastly kept one foot in the blues camp and the other in jazz, waxing jumping R&B for Mercury (in 1954) and Bethlehem (1957), jazz for Riverside in 1961 (with Cannonball Adderley), and blues for Blues Time and ABC-BluesWay.

Saxophonist and bandleader Paul Williams scored one of the first big hits of the R&B era in 1949 with "The Hucklebuck," an adaption of Charlie Parker's "Now's the Time." The song topped the R&B charts for 14 weeks in 1949, and was one of three Top Ten and five other Top 20 R&B instrumental hits that Williams scored for Savoy in 1948 and 1949. He was later part of Atlantic Records' house band in the '60s, and directed the Lloyd Price and James Brown orchestras until 1964.

Earl Bostic played around the Midwest during the early '30s, studied at Xavier University, and toured with several bands before moving to New York in 1938. In the early '40s, he worked as an arranger and session musician, and began leading his own regular large group in 1945. Cutting back to a septet the next year, Bostic began recording regularly, scoring his first big hit with 1948's "Temptation." He soon signed with the King label, the home of most of his biggest jukebox hits. In 1951, Bostic landed a number one R&B hit with "Flamingo," plus another Top Ten in "Sleep." Subsequent hits included "You Go to My Head" and "Cherokee." Bostic's bands became important training grounds for up-and-coming jazzmen like John Coltrane, Blue Mitchell, Stanley Turrentine, Benny Golson, Jaki Byard, and others.

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ARTISTSONGALBUM
Sonny Boy Williamson II The Sky Is Crying (Keep It To Ourselves)Sony Boy Williamson in Europe
Sonny Boy Williamson IIDissatisfiedSony Boy Williamson in Europe
Little Brother MontgomeryKeep Drinking Dealing With The Devil
James CottonDealing With The DevilDealing With The Devil
Otis SpannI Came From Clarksdale The Blues of Otis Spann
Roosevelt SykesSail OnAmerican Folk Blues Festival 1962-1965
Johnny 'Big Moose' WalkerGoing Home TomorrowGoing Home Tomorrow
Juke Boy BonnerB.U. BluesThings Ain't Right:The 1969 London Sessions
Fred McDowell Diving Duck BluesIn London Vol. 1
Cousin Joe American Blues Legends '74American Blues Legends '74
Doctor Ross Seems Like A DreamAmerican Blues Legends '74
Walter HortonThat Ain't ItAmerican Folk Blues Festival '70
Big John WrencherTouble Makin' WomanBig John's Boogie
Chicago Blues All StarsLittle Boy BlueLoaded With The Blues
Muddy WatersFeel Like Goin' HomeOne More Mile
Muddy WatersMy Pencil Won't Write No More One More Mile
Robert Pete WilliamsTake It Along Everywhere You GoBlues Masters Vol. 1
Big Joe WilliamsHand Me Down My Old Walking StickHand Me Down My Old Walking Stick
Bukka WhiteAberdeen BluesSparkasse In Concert
Howlin' Wolf Smokestack Lightning The American Folk-Blues Festival 1962-1966 DVD Vol.4
Sister Rosetta TharpeTrouble In MindAmerican Folk Blues Festival DVD Vol. 4
Brownie McGheeMy Last Suit The Best Of Brownie McGhee
Sonny Terry & Brownie McGheeHooray, Hooray, This Woman Is Killing Me Chris Barber Presents Lost & Found Vol. 1
Champion Jack DupreeStoryville SpecialBarrelhouse Blues & Boogie Woogie
Sunnyland Slim Get Further Little BrotherBarrelhouse Blues & Boogie Woogie
James Booker Papa Was A RascalLive At Montreux

Show Notes:

Sonny Boy Williamson:Portrait In BluesToday's program is the third and final program of  our look at blues artists who  recorded in Europe spanning the late 40's through the 70's. Outside of Lonnie Johnson and Alberta Hunter, the blues hadn't reached European shores prior to the 1940's The late 40's saw a few artists such as Leadbelly and Sammy Price hit Europe, with Price being the first to record. Josh White recorded the first guitar blues outside the U.S. But the biggest impact was Big Bill Broonzy's arrival in 1951 and subsequent tours through 1957. By 1958 Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee and Muddy Waters had come to England. 1960 saw Jack Dupree, Memphis Slim, Roosevelt Sykes, Little Brother Montgomery and Speckled Red appear in England. Dupree and Slim would both settle in Europe. Europe would become a haven for blues pianists with Curtis Jones, Eddie Boyd and Little Willie Littlefield all settling there. 1962 saw the inaugural American Folk Blues Festival which featured the absolute cream of the blues scene and toured almost annually until 1972. During the 70's blues artists continued to tour Europe and there were package tours such as The American Blues Legends Tour which ran in 1973, 74, 75 and 79 and major concerts like the Montreux Jazz Festival which always had a blues component. Other artists also recorded in Europe like Blind John Davis, Professor Longhair, Lightnin' Slim and Louisiana Red who settled in Germany.

We open the show with a pair of tracks by Sonny Boy Williamson II who we've spotlighted in out first two installments. Sonny Boy Williamson first traveled to Europe as part of the American Folk Blues Festival in 1963 and joined the festival again in 1964. Williamson stayed on after the tour trying to establish residency but it wasn't to be. Giorgio Gomelsky, who ran the Crawdaddy Club,  claims that he convinced promoter Horst Lippmann to let Sonny Boy remain in Britain so that “we could organize a tour of the budding R&B club circuit and strengthen the blues scene.” It appears that Williamson returned to the United States with the rest of the cast but he was back in London by early December for a series of concerts at the Marquee Club, including a Christmas Eve gig with the Cyril Davies All-Stars and Long John Baldry that made him an “honorary member of the British pop elite.” Williamson ushered in 1964 at the Marquee with the Chris Barber Band and Ottilie Patterson and in January he played the club at least once a week, alternately backed by the Hoochie Coochie Men and the Yardbirds. His reception,and the club’s attendance, was so overwhelming that Williamson applied for an extension to his work permit so that he could play a short tour of the provinces with the Yardbirds and additional dates in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham.

American Blues Legends '74It must have been humbling to go from such great renown in Europe only to return to the states  and once again hawk his namesake cornmeal and promote gigs over KFFA's  "King Biscuit Time" in Helena Arkansas. Despite the bowler hat and suit, his stories of adoring  white crowds were met with skepticism among the locals. Willie Dixon, who organized the American Folk Blues Festival, put Sonny Boy on the second and third tours and held him in high regard. As Dixon wrote in his autobiography "Sonny Boy Williamson was a beautiful guy. He wasn't a liar like a lot of guys. Most guys talking about themselves exaggerate a little bit. But if Sonny Boy told you it was, it was." Sonny Boy was truly appreciative of all the attention, and contemplated moving to Europe permanently but went back to the States where he made some final recordings for Chess.

We spin two today by Muddy Waters who first appeared oversea in Britain in 1958, returning again in 1962 and 1964.  This time out we play two wonderful acoustic performances from a 1972 Swiss radio broadcast. These sides were first released on the 2-CD set One More Mile.

In our second installment we featured Muddy Waters performing in 1964 as part of the American Folk Blues and Gospel Caravan. In May of 1964, the touring Folk, Blues, and Gospel Caravan featuring Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Muddy Waters and Cousin Joe performed a quirky, rain-drenched concert outside Manchester, England at a deserted Railway Station which had been decorated or 'dressed up' as a deep south railroad station. The railroad boarding platform served as a make-shift stage and the rail yard was filled with an audience. This time out we spotlight Sister Rosetta's knockout performance of "Trouble In Mind." Rosetta was introduced by Cousin Joe: "Ladies and Gentleman at this time I get great pleasure in bringing to you one of the greatest, one of the worlds greatest, gospel singers and guitar virtuosos, the inimitable Sister Rosetta Tharpe." As the rain poured down she launched into  "Didn't It Rain" and then "Trouble In Mind." This wasn't Tharpe's first time in Britain as she had toured first back in 1957 backed by Chris Barber's band. She was also the sole woman on the 1970 American Folk Blues Festival.

Once again we play several tracks from the American Folk Blues Festival (AFBF) which was an annual event that featured the cream of American blues musicians barnstorming their way across Europe throughout the 60's. The impact of these annual tours had a profound impact on those that were in attendance. Future stars such as Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page any many others were in the audience and were directly influenced by what they saw. The rise of blues based bands like the The Rolling Stones, Yardbirds and Animals can be directly attributed to the AFBF. The festival, founded by Horst Lippmann and Fritz Rau in 1962, featured performances by luminaries like John Lee Hooker, T-Bone Walker, Muddy Waters, Memphis Slim, and Willie Dixon and drew sellout crowds and rave reviews. Many of the artists found they were far more popular in Britain than in the United States, where audiences for the blues were diminishing. Several emigrated, and others seized the new commercial opportunities presented by the British blues boom by recording extensively for the European market and touring the blues club circuit with bands comprised of their young devotees.

American Folk Blues Festival 1964
1964 AFBF ensemble (The British Tour): Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon, Sleepy John Estes, Sonny Boy Williamson II, Sunnyland Slim, Sugar Pie DeSanto, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Hubert Sumlin

Horst Lippman hired Willie Dixon as a consultant on the tour. "Willie was my guide to all the clubs and most of the people", Lipmann recalled. "I'd go to all the main clubs where Muddy played and Wolf's place Silvio's and then little clubs on the corner you'd get in and suddenly there was Magic Sam playing …and another West Side club where Otis Rush was playing. These were not famous clubs but Willie knew them. At that time, Chicago was full of blues music, especially on the South Side."

Howlin' Wolf's appearance as part of the AFBF was much anticipated. In How Britain Got The Blues Roberta Freund Shwartz writes: "The 6’6” Wolf was the most energetic showman in Chicago and was known to lunge about the stage, climb curtains, do back flips and anything else he could think of to get an audience on its feet. Both R&B Monthly and R ‘n’ B Scene thought it prudent to forewarn their readers. “From reports, his act is essentially visual, and it will be another hallmark in British blues appreciation to see this massive bluesman roar his blues.”72 Willie Dixon was so concerned about possible reactions that he ordered Howlin’ Wolf to “act right” on stage. From published reviews and remembrances it seems that he toned down his usual antics, but his size and menacing stage presence were enough to make an indelible impression. Alan Stevens of Melody Maker reported, 'He pads around the stage like a caged animal, fixes his baleful stare, makes a violent movement of his hands, then belts out the blues with such power and effect that the whole of his massive frame shakes ….' According to Simon Napier, Wolf’s Festival performances 'varied from day to day somewhat as to content quality and power … some days he got over very well, at others he was less effective.' At Croydon and Manchester he 'brought down the house' with 'Shake for Me' and was 'absolutely great.' Long John Baldry recalled, 'It was just magic watching him.' …Not only had his powerful Festival performances earned him new fans, he also had a record on the charts. 'Smokestack Lightnin,' [Pye 7N52244] a song that had been in Wolf’s repertoire since the early 1930s, broke the British Top 50 shortly after its release in June; it peaked at #42 on the national charts but in Manchester and Newcastle it was in the Top Twenty. This granted him almost mainstream stardom and during his stay he appeared on nearly every pop television and radio program in the country, including the iconic Juke Box Jury."

The American Blues Legends tour was run by promoter Jim Simpson who operated the Big Bear label. Simpson released albums of the tour for the years 1973, 1974, 1975 and 1979. In the previous programs we've featured selections from the 1973 and 1979 tours and today we spotlight a pair from the 1974 tour. That toured featured Eddie Taylor, Doctor Ross, Big John Wrencher, G.P. Jackson and Cousin Joe. Joe's "Blues Legends '74" is an autobiographical song about the tour and is also where today's show title comes from.

Several tracks across these three programs come from the Storyville label. Named after the notorious New Orleans district where jazz was born, the Storyville label was launched in Copenhagen in 1952 by jazz fanatic Karl Emil Knudsen. Storyville originally sold imported American records but when the burgeoning post war jazz scene attracted the American jazz and blues artists to tour in Europe and Scandinavia Knudsen seized every opportunity to record his jazz and blues heroes for the label. From the beginning the label was issuing 45's by people like Champion Jack Dupree, Big Bill Broonzy, Josh White, Memphis Slim, Snooks Eaglin, Speckled Red and Leadbelly and then later releasing albums by these same artists. Notable where the label's "Portraits In Blues" series which featured full-length albums by Snooks Eaglin, John Henry Barbee, Big Joe Williams, Sunnyland Slim and others.

Big Walter Horton is featured twice today, once with the group Chicago Blues Allstars and and a performance under his own name at the 1965 AFBF. The Chicago Blues All Stars were a group that included Horton, Johnny Shines, Willie Dixon, Clifton James and  Sunnyland Slim.  The group issued one album,  Loaded With The Blues,  for the German MPS label in 1969.

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ARTISTSONGALBUM
Madelyn James Long Time BluesMemphis Blues 192 -1938
Madelyn James Stinging Snake BluesMemphis Blues 192 -1938
Holy Ghost Sanctified SingersJesus Throwed Up A Highway For MeMemphis Sanctified Jug Bands 1928-1930
Eli Green Brooks Run Into The OceanYou Got To Move
Eli Green Bulldog Blues You Got To Move
Blind Willie JohnsonYou're Gonna Need Somebody on Your BondThe Complete Blind Willie Johnson
Willie Lee HarrisNever Drive a Stranger from Your Door Rare Country Blues 1928-1937
Hammie NixonThe Judge, He Pleaded (Viola Lee Blues)Tappin' That Thing
Nat RiddlesCross My Heart New York Really Has the Blues Vol. 3
Roy Dunn Rollin' MillBlues Come To Chapel Hill
Frank Edwards Love My BabyBlues Come To Chapel Hill
Elester AndersonFurther Down The Road
Carolina Country Blues
Henry JohnsonSittin' Down ThinkinCarolina Country Blues
Rosie Mae Moore Stranger BluesFour Women Blues
Memphis MinnieWhen The Sun Goes Down (Part 2)Four Women Blues
Clara SmithWoman to WomanThe Essential
Sunset Blues Band & Pee Wee CraytonPiney Brown Blues Funky Blues
Kansas City RedOpen Your Heart Original Chicago Blues
Lovie Lee West Side WomanGood Candy
Cousin Joe Juice On The Loose Cousin Joe Of New Orleans
Cousin Joe Evolution BluesCousin Joe Of New Orleans
Buddy Lewis Lonesome Bedroom BluesJuke Joint Blues 2
Left Handed CharlieMiss My LagnionJuke Joint Blues 2
Big ChenierPlease Try to RealiseJuke Joint Blues 2
Larry Johnson & Nat RiddlesI Believe Basin' Free
Larry Johnson & Nat RiddlesJohnson! Where Did You Get That Sound?Johnson! Where Did You Get That Sound?
Larry JohnsonFour Women Blues Fast & Funky
Charlie PattonJersey Bull BluesThe Best Of
Johnnie TempleJinks Lee BluesJohnnie Temple Vol. 3 1940-1949

Show Notes:

Cross my fingers, this is the first mix show in some time that I'm not featuring somebody who just passed away. Lots of interesting records on tap today including a set revolving around the Memphis Jug Band, twin spins of Eli Green, Cousin Joe, several tracks featuring New York artists Larry Johnson and Nat Riddles, some  fine latter day Chicago blues and some exceptional pre-war blues.  We spotlight several out-of-print records including a pair on the Flyright label and an obscure one featuring the great Pee Wee Crayton.

Features the only tracks by McDowell's mentor, Eli Green.
Reissued on CD as You Got To Move

A month ago we did an in-depth feature on the Memphis Jug Band. Today we open up with an addendum of sorts with two tracks by singer Madeyln James and one by the Holy Ghost Sanctified Singers. There's speculation that the Memphis Jug Band was the group who recorded in Memphis on a February 21, 1930 date resulting in four gospel and two secular sides. As the the Holy Ghost Sanctified Singers on "Thou Carest Lord, For Me", "Jesus Throwed Up A Highway For Me", "Sinner I'd Make A Change", "When I Get Inside The Gate" and backing singer Madelyn James on "Stinging Snake Blues" and "Long Time Blues."

Eli Green was a mentor to Mississippi Fred McDowell and also Junior Kimbrough. With McDowell's help, Chris Strachwitz of Arhoolie records, located Green in Holly Springs, Mississippi in 1965. He recorded him on the two songs, "Brooks Run Into The Ocean" and "Bulldog Blues", with backing by McDowell. These are the only recordings Green ever cut and are available on the Arhoolie CD, You Got To Move.

Born December 20, 1907 in Wallace, Louisiana, Cousin Joe made a name for himself on the Crescent City nightclub circuit of the mid-1930s before relocating to New York City in 1942; there he recorded prolifically through the 40's. He returned to New Orleans in 1947, recording material for the Deluxe and Imperial labels before signing a five-year pact with Decca; however, he entered the studio only rarely in the years to follow. After a long hiatus, he recorded and released an impromptu 1971 session under the title Bad Luck Blues, followed in 1973 by Cousin Joe from New Orleans where today's tracks come from. His activities were again curtailed in the years to follow, although he cut a final album in 1983 and in 1987 he published an autobiography, Cousin Joe: Blues from New Orleans. He died October 2, 1989.

Read Liner Notes

Nat Riddles played an important role in the New York blues scene during the late 1970's to mid 1980's. He became known in New York blues circles for his street performances with guitarist Charlie Hilbert and as well as performing with Larry Johnson. He also performed regularly at Dan Lynch's in NYC  a blues hotbed that that saw the emergence of recording artists like The Holmes Brother and Bobby Radcliff. Almost Riddles' recordings are out of print: he has scattered sides on various albums for the Spivey label (appears on several volumes of New York Really Has The "Blues Stars") plus a whole album on the label (The Art Of Nat Riddles). Riddles also appears on a fine recording with Larry Johnson for the L + R label, Johnson! Where Did You Get That Sound?, and a posthumous album of live recordings with Charlie Hilbert that came out in 2007. Riddles died of leukemia in August 1991 at the age of 39.

After a stint in the Navy from 1955 to 1959, Larry Johnson moved to New York and befriended Brownie and Sticks McGhee and began playing on records by Big Joe Williams, Harry Atkins, and Alec Seward. It was Seward who introduced Johnson to his future mentor, Rev. Gary Davis. He released his first single, "Catfish Blues"/"So Sweet," in 1962 and appeared on numerous live dates with Davis. By 1970, Johnson began releasing albums on small labels. Although never prolific, he cut consistently fine albums including Fast and Funky from 1971 and where our featured track, "Four Women Blues" comes from, the out-of-print Basin Free with Nat Riddles on the Spivey label and the marvelous Blues For Harlem issued in 1999.

We spin some terrific latter day Chicago blues from the under recorded Kansas City drummer/singer Kansas City Red and pianist Lovie Lee. By the early 1940's Red was hanging round with Robert Nighthawk. One night the band’s drummer took ill right before a gig and he offered to fill in despite never having played drums before. He ended up playing drums for Nighthawk until around 1946. After his split with Nighthawk he briefly hooked up with Honeyboy Edwards. He had an uncanny knack for hustling gigs and began singing by this period. In the 1950s he formed a band with Earl Hooker and pianist Ernest Lane. He moved to Chicago in the 1950's, occasionally sitting in with Muddy Waters. He formed a group with Walter Horton that included Johnny Young and Johnny Shines. During this period he played with Robert Lockwood Jr., Eddie Taylor, Jimmy Reed, Floyd Jones, Blind John Davis, Elmore James, and others. Starting with the Club Reno, he managed a number of Chicago bars and owned a couple as well. Through the 1970's and 1980's he held down stints at a number of Chicago clubs. His recorded legacy is slim with a handful of sessions for Barrelhouse, JSP, and Earwig. His last major engagement was at the 1991 Chicago Blues Festival. He died of cancer on his sixty-fifth birthday on May 7, 1991. Today's cut comes from a hard-hitting record issued on the JSP label and the Japanese P-Vine label, Original Chicago Blues, that also features Big John Wrencher and Eddie Taylor.

Lovie Lee grew up in Meridian, Mississippi, and was self taught piano player. He found part time employment playing with the Swinging Cats in the early 1950's. The outfit included Carey Bell, who Lee took under his fatherly protection, and they jointly relocated to Chicago in September 1956. Lee worked during the day in a woodworking factory, and for many years played in the evening in numerous Chicago blues nightclubs. After he retired from full-time day work, Lee joined Muddy Waters band in 1979, replacing Pinetop Perkins. Lee made some private recordings in both 1984 and 1989, and this work plus later contemporary tracks, were released as the album Good Candy in 1992.

As always we spotlight a few long out-of-print records including two companion albums issued on the Flyright label in 1973: Blues Come To Chapel Hill and Carolina Country Blues. These were recorded in March 1973 live at the Chapel Hill Festival at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill by Pete Lowry. Most of the artists were recorded by Lowry for his Trix label including Frank Edwards, Roy Dunn, Tarheel Slim, Henry Johnson, Peg Leg Sam, Willie Trice and Guitar Shorty. Elester Anderson and Tommy Lee Russell were recorded extensively by Lowry but nothing was issued commercially.

The generically titled and plain looking album, Sunset Blues Band: Funky Blues, was released on the Sunset budget label and recorded for the United Artists/Liberty group in 1969 featuring Pee Wee Crayton with a session group. Pee Wee's name is not credited on the LP and Pee Wee admitted he did not know what happened to this material after he recorded it. This has been re-released years ago on Charly records.

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